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More SCDOT Fail

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“KEEP IT BETWEEN THE LINES …”

This website has repeatedly documented how the S.C. Department of Transportation (SCDOT) is an abject failure at the macro level.  Not to mention corrupt as hell.

We’re not the only ones who think so, either …

In fact with the exception of the Palmetto State’s failed government-run education system, we can’t think of another example of “more” consistently producing “less.”  Seriously: The more money our “leaders” dump into this bureaucracy, the worse its outcomes get.

Anyway … while painting this “big picture,” we also occasionally like to provide our readers with example of SCDOT’s failure at the micro level.  Like here.  Or here.

Earlier this month, one of our readers in Laurens County, S.C. told us about a road near Fountain Inn, S.C. that recently had its lanes repainted by a SCDOT crew.

How’d they do?  Um …

(Click to enlarge)

fountain inn

(Pic via Facebook)

Yikes …

“This road is already past due for resurfacing and has huge potholes the entire length of the road,” taxpayer James Kamp noted.

That’s no problem for SCDOT, though.  The agency just painted over the potholes.

Take a look …

(Click to enlarge)

fountain inn road

(Pic via Facebook)

“This is precisely why the SCDOT needs a top to bottom overhaul,” Kamp wrote.  “This is also why I will never support any tax increase or additional taxation that is slated for the SCDOT.”

Amen to that …

We’ve said it before, we’ll say it again: The Palmetto State has more than enough revenue available to fix its crumbling network of roads and bridges – and properly maintain/ responsibly expand this network moving forward.

Hell, the agency has seen a massive 110 percent increase in base, recurring funding over the last seven years alone.

(Click to enlarge)

transportation funding

(Chart via S.C. Senate)

SCDOT doesn’t need more money from tax hikes … or constitutionally-dubious borrowing schemes.

What does it need? Proper prioritization of projects and long-overdue administrative reform.

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