South Carolina lieutenant governor Glenn McConnell‘s six-figure, state-funded retirement plan has run into a Holy City-sized speed bump …

The incoming president of the College of Charleston is facing broad, deep and vocal opposition from students, faculty, alumni and donors at the school he hopes to lead.

And the worst could be yet to come …

The most visible form of disdain has been the mass student protests taking place on campus – demonstrations driven by anger over McConnell’s Confederate past.

“Everywhere you go in Charleston it’s all people are talking about,” one source close to the drama tells FITS. “The students seem determined – while the school’s trustees are dug in (behind McConnell). Connected college folks are rooting for an overthrow. I don’t think it’s going to die down anytime soon.”

Our source is correct …

Those¬†familiar with the ongoing kerfuffle tell FITS the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) – a far-left “civil rights” organization based in Montgomery, Alabama – is about to get involved in the fight against McConnell.

That’s a major development. Not only is the SPLC flush with cash (nearly $300 million according to its latest tax filings) – it has tentacles deep within the U.S. court system and the Justice Department of U.S. President Barack Obama.

In other words it’s the sort of adversary McConnell has to take very seriously.

For the record, we don’t think McConnell is a racist – and we didn’t oppose the College of Charleston’s decision to hire him on the basis of his, um, “colorful” past. We objected to McConnell’s hiring because we don’t believe politicians should be permitted to inherit jobs at the institutions they previously fund (and which their buddies continue to fund).

Such a process is inherently corrupt – and we saw that corruption at work during the debate over McConnell’s selection.

We also object to McConnell’s goal of turning the College of Charleston into another “research University,” which as we’ve noted in the past is code language for wasting tens of millions of tax dollars on speculative “economic development” deals that weren’t sufficiently promising to receive private funding.

In other words race has very little to do with our contempt for McConnell …

Also, we suspect McConnell will trot out an army of Lowcountry black leaders to counter whatever moves the SPLC makes against him – which could help him frame the organization’s campaign as politically motivated, not based in a genuine desire to advance racial kumbaya.

He can also continue to count on receiving support – and cover with the black community – from longtime Charleston, S.C. mayor (and friend of Obama) Joe Riley.

If McConnell can somehow rally sufficient homegrown black support – and successfully portray the SPLC as agenda-driven outside agitators – he may have a chance.

One thing is clear, though … the Ides of March may have passed, but the Ides of McConnell are just beginning.