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THOUSANDS OF WORKERS ALSO CASUALTIES OF UNION STRIKE

Although its vise grip on the American private sector has diminished in recent decades, organized labor is still a job killer in this country.

Just ask the Twinkie – a.k.a. the “Golden Sponge Cake with Creamy Filling.”  Oh … and ask the 19,000 employees of Hostess Brands, who are headed to the unemployment lines as a result of a strike against the company organized by the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union (which represents 6,600 Hostess employees).

“We deeply regret the necessity of today’s decision,” the company said in a statement, “but we don’t have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike.”

That’s true … Hostess filed for bankruptcy in January 2012 and has been struggling to make ends meet ever since.

As we’ve stated repeatedly, unions are a cancer on our economy – which is why they have been gradually weeded out of the private sector over the course of the last seven decades.

A total of 14.7 million workers – or 11.8 percent of the nation’s workforce – were unionized in 2011, according to data from the U.S. Department of Labor. That’s roughly the same number as 2010 – when unionized workers represented 11.9 percent of the workforce.  Not surprisingly, government continues to keep these parasites in business – with 37 percent of the taxpayer-funded workforce currently represented by a union compared to just 6.9 percent of the private sector workforce.

Back in the 1940s the reverse was true – with 33.9 percent of the private sector workforce unionized compared to just 9.8 percent of the public sector.

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