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S.C. State Almost Had Its Power Turned Off

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GOVERNMENT-RUN SCHOOL’S DIRE FINANCIAL STRAITS EXPOSED … 

|| By FITSNEWS ||   S.C. State University (SCSU)’s chronic fiscal woes nearly resulted in the school having its power disconnected, a new report from The (Orangeburg, S.C.) Times and Democrat reveals.

According to documents obtained by the paper via the state’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) laws, SCSU was warned by the Orangeburg Department of Public Utilities on February 16 that its “now delinquent and subject to disconnection.”

“In previous correspondence with you and the university’s attorney, it was made abundantly clear that in order to have additional time to pay these bills, arrangements must be made,” an email from the utility to the school read. “To date, no arrangements have been made by you or your staff to pay these bills.”

Yikes …

Meanwhile at a meeting of the S.C. Budget and Control Board (SCBCB) in Columbia, S.C., an audit revealed the school’s debt was expected to soar to $23.4 million within the next few months.

“This is worse than any of us thought it could be,” S.C. governor Nikki Haley said of the situation.

Yeah … which is why state leaders should stop approving unconstitutional taxpayer bailouts to keep its doors open.

Dogged by rampant corruption, shady boondoggles, overblown bureaucracy and questionable expenses for its leaders, SCSU is nothing short of a fiscal disaster – one that’s continuing to get worse as the school fails to adjust its exorbitant overhead in response to declining enrollment.

Of course the supporters of the historically black school aren’t hearing that.

They’re playing the race card … 

Sheesh …

This website has been consistent from day one regarding SCSU and the entire South Carolina system of “higher education” – which (shocker) happens to be one of the most bloated, duplicative and disproportionately costly networks of taxpayer-funded colleges and universities in the entire country.

Our view? Each of the state’s thirty-three government-subsidized institutions of “higher learning” should immediately be set free to pursue their destinies in the private sector.

Higher education is simply not a core function of government, people … especially not the way it’s done in the Palmetto State.

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