The American economy is still struggling to establish consistent forward momentum in 2013, but one segment that’s experiencing “rapid fire” growth is the gun industry.

Sales are through the roof and there seems to be no slowing demand … meaning gun manufacturers are likely to be a solid employment bet for the foreseeable future. Also given the anti-gun laws being passed by dark blue states in the American Northeast, gun manufacturers are looking at moving to friendlier business climates.

That’s great … capitalism at work. At least on the surface …

Problems begin when elected officials and government bureaucrats enter the equation … as they are in the courtship of Connecticut-based PTR Industries, whose co-owner Josh Fiorini recently gave an interview with a South Carolina newspaper discussing the possibility of locating 100 low income jobs in the Palmetto State over the next 2-3 years.

“Company executives met with state and local economic development officials as well as the area’s political leaders and found them all accommodating,” The (Myrtle Beach, S.C.) Sun News reported. “(Fiorni) said a round of golf at the Dunes Club, which he enjoyed, was part of the recruiting trip.”

Of course they found state leaders “accommodating.” After all this is South Carolina, where we tax money from existing individuals and businesses is habitually used to bribe other companies to come here.

Oh … and we wonder who paid for that round of golf?

Anyway, how has South Carolina’s command economic strategy worked out for us so far? Not well. In fact our state’s labor participation rate is currently at an all-time low.

Anyway … we would love to see PTR and numerous other gun manufacturers locate in the Palmetto State. These companies are clearly no longer wanted in the kneejerk Northeast, and as U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan has repeatedly stated South Carolina should welcome them with open arms.

What would we love to see even more than that, though? A competitive business climate … one which didn’t rely on robbing taxpayers to subsidize “economic development.”