SC

Letter: May The Confederate Flag Decline In Vigor And Strength

RE: The Conferderate Flag: It’s 2000 All Over Again Dear Editor:  Those who want the Confederate flag to remain atop the Capitol or its grounds should reexamine another definition of the word ‘flag,’ which is “to decline in vigor or strength.” Vigor and strength – much like our bodies, our…

RE: The Conferderate Flag: It’s 2000 All Over Again

Dear Editor:  Those who want the Confederate flag to remain atop the Capitol or its grounds should reexamine another definition of the word ‘flag,’ which is “to decline in vigor or strength.”

Vigor and strength – much like our bodies, our jobs, and our ways of life – do decline.  And so should the Confederate flag.

Allow the Confederate flag to retire with dignity, with honor, and with love rather than with divisiveness, with dishonor, and with reprehension.  Allow the Confederate flag, as it is great and like all great things, find repose in an elegy I happily would write, for such a decline could never replace what many considered its vigor and its strength.  Allow it to wave forever unscathed in the hearts of those who gallantly fought for what they believed was best for South Carolina and the nation then, though we know that it does not now and cannot ever represent what our founding fathers inked into the Constitution as a free America – for all peoples.

The Confederate flag has flown vigorously and augustly in its time.  Now, the time has come again to remove it and go forward with America’s new agenda, putting aside perceived, acknowledged, and real truths of what it did represent.

For millions in this country, the Confederate flag represents part of a dark past of struggle and hatred that continues to emerge in less-conspicuous ways today, like at banks, at personnel offices, at newspapers, at television stations, and in the per-capita incomes of many, especially African Americans and the poor of South Carolina.

This flag emerges as a reminder that even in a state where nearly half of its citizenry is African American, there are lags that abound in the early manifestations of this red, white, and blue flag that represents separatism and superiority – the idea of “U.S. apartheid.”

And for its lovers, its proponents, may it fly high in the hearts of those who indulged it so – the dead, the Confederate, the voices from eery graves, some buried with epitaphs and some just in open ground.  Hear these men say with their final vigor and strength that the fight was not worth the effort and the loss expended.  It was senseless to engage in war over an issue with inevitable resolve.  Hear from the graves their voices saying, live and thrive now!  Know that these were men of honor.  When they lost the battle and the war, they accepted it with dignity, with honor, and with death.  May the proponents of such men find this worth and accept their same honor today.

It all seems strange that the state legislature in South Carolina in and around the early sixties was well aware that civil rights legislation was forthcoming.  Surely, one of the major pieces of civil rights legislation, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, would be the most historical, important, legislation in America.  These gentlemen, the 1962 General Assembly who decided to hoist the flag atop the State House, sagaciously envisaged a new South and they quickly found a way to remind its opponents of the old South.  They hurriedly passed legislation to place the flag atop the Capitol.  For this act, we currently remember them and we currently fight again.

Some remembrance continues with a certain hatred and some remembrance with a certain love, but both now manifest a certain divisiveness that may put South Carolina back into the streets with factions against each other.

Somehow, it isn’t necessary that 620,000 young Southern Americans, many whites who fought for Southern independence, die again.  Somehow the S.C. legislature must rethink its position and become the moral, conscionable authority in the flag issue and remove it from Capitol grounds and allow it to find repose in dignity and honor. Somehow Gov. Haley, the General Assembly, you and I must come to a simple truth – everything will change. For into the hands that made the rose may we all with trembling fall.

And so, may the Confederate flag decline in vigor and strength. Or may it decline always with divisiveness. As for me, I prefer that the Confederate flag find repose in its death of vigor and strength in a Confederate museum.

Sincerely,

@iRhysTay

SIC SEZ

sic

Rhys … thanks for the letter. Appreciate your perspective.

***

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Read more at https://www.fitsnews.com/2014/03/31/letter-nikki-haleys-dishonest-ad/#GcDQJz2Bq1E516cg.99

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53 comments

Pants Up Don't Shoot October 10, 2014 at 8:28 am

If we take the confederate flag down, can we impose a law that requires (blacks and whites) to put their fucking pants up to their waist?

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Squishy123 October 10, 2014 at 8:49 am

Or make black males responsible for their kids?

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Limbaughsaphatkhunt October 10, 2014 at 8:55 am

Or white single mothers responsible for getting food for their kids without food stamps.

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Pants Up Don't Shoot October 10, 2014 at 9:52 am

Or black single mothers ceasing to use their genitals as entitlement factories.

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Limbaughsaphatkhunt October 10, 2014 at 5:40 pm

Or loner white men shooting up offices, schools and movie theaters with assault weapons.

Mike at the Beach October 11, 2014 at 10:45 pm

Another (typically) poorly researched and irreverent bit of non sequitur from you on this. There have been a not-so-whopping 160 active shooter incidents in the US from 2000-2013, during which just under 500 victims were killed. This is not a good thing, obviously, but represents an over-hyped bit of media puffery in the scheme of US crime, when hundreds of thousand of Americans were murdered in the same time period. Progressive souls love active shooter stuff because it’s a 90% white male game and generally makes it easier to demonize guns. The active shooter “problem,” however, is small beans in the overall crime picture. Either way, a massively weak analogy to the racial divides and ratios in entitlement spending…

The Colonel October 10, 2014 at 8:55 am

I’d agree to that compromise

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Crooner October 10, 2014 at 1:36 pm

Comments above prove flag issue is about racism.

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GetAHobby October 10, 2014 at 1:50 pm

To whom?

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The Colonel October 10, 2014 at 2:11 pm

Only in your feeble little mind.

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Crooner October 10, 2014 at 4:24 pm

You’re to stupid to even realize it. Why would you tie flying the confederate flag to the behavior of African-Americans? What’s the relationship there?

TontoBubbaGoldstein October 10, 2014 at 9:17 pm

Why would you tie flying the confederate flag to the behavior of African-Americans? What’s the relationship there?

Hint:
Think “Colored People*” instead of “African-Americans”.

*As in the National Association of.

Centrist View October 10, 2014 at 9:25 am

Pants at half mast?

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Generational Welfare October 10, 2014 at 10:05 am

I’d settle for their poles being at half mast. It’s a money saver.

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Jackie Chiles October 10, 2014 at 9:14 am

I say we just exchange it for the Bonnie Blue flag. The Klan never used it, it honors people participating in the Civil War, and it just looks cooler.

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Buz Martin October 10, 2014 at 9:26 am

Good deal. That and the pants up thing.

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Bingo! October 10, 2014 at 10:39 am

You know, I really like your idea. Toss the ties to slavery out the window, but retain the notion of secession from unjust government.

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Original Good Old Boy October 10, 2014 at 11:33 am

That’s a sensible solution. Hence our legislators would never consider it.

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Smirks October 10, 2014 at 9:18 am

I’m just sick and tired of hearing about this nonsensical issue, myself. It really isn’t that big of a deal. We spend more time worrying about removing a flag from the State House grounds than we do removing shitty politicians from the State House grounds, and no surprise, it shows.

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So much for compromise October 10, 2014 at 9:26 am

Personally, I never think about that flag until I see some raggedy-ass pickup driving down the road with a pole mounted on the back. That is, until someone decides that they want to get elected and there it is – in my face every time I glance at the news. Give them the flag and tell them to stfu. But that monument must go with it.

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Original Good Old Boy October 10, 2014 at 11:36 am

Why the monument? Why can’t people realize that history is complicated and not everything is black and white. Those who fought and died for the Confederacy largely fought to defend their state.

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So much for compromise October 10, 2014 at 12:24 pm

if the blacks want to go back on their original agreement to have the flag removed from the dome then they should lose what they gained in the agreement. THAT SIMPLE.

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GetAHobby October 10, 2014 at 12:57 pm

They agreed that moving to the statehouse grounds was an acceptable resolution, now it’s just not good enough any longer. If it’s moved to a museum, eventually that won’t be acceptable any more and they’ll want it removed from there because it’s just to painful. There really is no resolve that will adequately pacify the portion of the population that want to beat this dead dog.

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So much for compromise October 10, 2014 at 4:00 pm

And I understand that they would never agreement to lose the monument, therefore, the flag would remain. We seem to be making the same point that they do not understand compromise, only take and cry, take and cry.

getwithit October 10, 2014 at 9:26 pm

I suspect the stars and bars, much like the stars and stripes, will continue to lose all relevancy to our pluralistic society where notions of heritage and history appear at times quaint, if not simple-minded.

shifty henry October 10, 2014 at 10:13 am

Sooo… “flag down” and “pants up” — yes, that means today is Friday!

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9" October 10, 2014 at 11:00 am Reply
Original Good Old Boy October 10, 2014 at 11:32 am

That’s some flowery writing, for sure. In any event, I don’t buy the argument that “it only belongs in a museum.” The Statehouse grounds have always contained historical monuments and symbols. While the flag is controversial, it is also part of our history and a defining part of our state’s past.
I think the problem isn’t necessarily placing the flag on the grounds, but rather placing the flag front and center next to Main and Gervais. I think a more appropriate setting would be off to the side — somewhere less visible from traffic.

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CONFEDERATEFLAGFOREVER October 10, 2014 at 11:35 am

I WILL NEVER MY LOWER MY CONFEDERATE BATTLE FLAG. LOWER YOUR FAG FLAG YOU SELF-HATING WHITE PIECE OF SHIT RACE TRAITOR. GO SUCK A NIGGER DICK WHILE YOU ARE AT IT.

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a face in the crowd October 10, 2014 at 12:23 pm

Psychopathic Klan member does not know the difference between public and private property. No one gives a shit if you fly the confederate flag in your single-wide. The argument is that it does not belong on public property. Crawl back in your ditch.

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TontoBubbaGoldstein October 10, 2014 at 9:39 pm

No one gives a shit if you fly the confederate flag in your single-wide.

Only because they won’t know it’s there. They will give a shit if you fly it over your single-wide.

The argument is that it does not belong on public property.

The argument used to be that it didn’t belong over the Statehouse dome. TBG wonders what “the argument” will be 15 years from now.

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a face in the crowd October 11, 2014 at 12:35 pm

Not true on your first point. Many people fly the flag on private property, consistent with the First Amendment. On your second point, the Statehouse dome is public property, as is the Statehouse lawn. If you want to look at it militarily, there is no room for the flag of an enemy of the U.S. on public property.

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TontoBubbaGoldstein October 11, 2014 at 2:54 pm

Not true on your first point.

http://www.live5news.com/story/13235751/copy-sc-neighborhood-doesnt-like-confederate-flag

PRO TIP:
Start with the assumption that TBG is always right…

a face in the crowd October 11, 2014 at 3:52 pm

Nice anecdote. Now consider thousands of other cases — and pick-up truck license plates.

TontoBubbaGoldstein October 11, 2014 at 4:53 pm

…pick-up truck license plates.

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/new-confederate-license-plate-brings-skirmishes/ndSjT/

Aight.

First Rule of Holes:
When you’re in one…stop digging.

a face in the crowd October 11, 2014 at 5:31 pm

I’m not in one — you’re the delusional South Carolinian in this equation.

yeah right October 10, 2014 at 12:39 pm

$10 says this an Obama supporter just trying to get shit started.

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9" October 10, 2014 at 5:37 pm

Do you swallow?

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Jacob October 10, 2014 at 9:47 pm

It’s hard to see where people get the idea that the flag (that is coming down eventually) is tied to racism and extremism (and a history of violence and terrorism)…

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major major October 10, 2014 at 11:44 am

…even in a state where nearly half of its citizenry is African American

According to the latest U.S. Census Bureau figures it’s actually 27.9%. Nit-picking aside, though, I agree with the sentiment of the article.

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Crooner October 10, 2014 at 1:35 pm

It’s merely a matter of time before it comes down and is relegated to the museums it belongs in. The vast majority of the under 40 crowd understands this symbol has been co-opted by the bigoted and intolerant such that its message of southern pride and valor has been drowned out. Moreover, the younger folks empathize with those whose ancestors were oppressed under this flag and how they are hurt by this symbol flying over their statehouse grounds.
Those opposing its removal are, once again, on the wrong side of history.

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Furl The Flag Boys October 10, 2014 at 2:26 pm

That’s correct.

It’s coming down sooner rather than later,but it’s a good vehicle to fan the racial flames a little longer.

Whats funny is when it does come down,it will be like the Civil Rights Acts passage.It was fought tooth and nail in Dixie,yet within a few years after its passage,it was almost impossible to find anyone who’d “really ” opposed it!

I can see it now.Fast forward about ten years from now, as the flag is being lowered for the final time.It will be hard to find anyone who ever “really” favored keeping it flying.

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Bryan Daniel Wright October 10, 2014 at 3:34 pm

This issue is most likely to always be a problem with ignorant people. It is at an appropriate location. Sadly to some people it’s now more visible than when it was on the dome. It is only a 3 ft square flag. Compared to a huge slave monument on the statehouse grounds. Which of the 2 resembles and reminds people of a once slave nation north and south. We do not hold the USA flag accountable for slavery. Why not? The confederacy only existed for 4 years. Why not honor all of history for each and every accomplishments black white or whichever race. Blame game is always against the south and it’s people. I for one have many ancestors from all wars and the confederate army. If blacks can honor Martin Luther king and Malcolm x or tupac. Why can’t I honor my heritage without a label. South Carolina should not be held by demands of a compromise that was reached in 2000. It is finished and it’s at an honorable location. Be content that it’s off the dome and leave it be. It’s only a publicity stunt to get more black votes or whomever who don’t agrees votes. Perhaps read history and understand all points.

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Soft Sigh from Hell October 11, 2014 at 4:23 pm

“Compared to a huge slave monument on the statehouse grounds.”

Hardly huge, but to the CSA monument you really need to add those of Ben “Jim Crow” Tillman, Ol’ Dixiecrat Strom, and Dr. “Mengele” Sims.

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Bryan Daniel Wright October 11, 2014 at 10:08 pm

We’ll I would say take every damn one off the grounds but then some damn fool would put up a damn monument of Obama. Hell all they do anymore is make demands and expect positive results. How positive is it for ignorant fools to worry over a flag. It is not a real issue that is destroying anyone. Look at a real threat to our homeland like Isis. Oh no now Jackson claims Ebola is racial profiling. How is this the white mans fault. Oh no we have furguson racist too. Oh my race cards are flying like 52 card pick up. The liberal democrats have nothing on the plate except race race race. They could not do Michael browns funeral without putting the democrat vote in the damn eulogy. They could not do the early service without asking for donations. Money and race is all these people know. Protests and looting is making these people look ignorant. You know racism try looking why you or anyone is racist yourselves. Racist blacks is just as bad as racist whites. Look at furguson and it’s being proven over and over.

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Bryan Daniel Wright October 10, 2014 at 3:34 pm

This issue is most likely to always be a problem with ignorant people. It is at an appropriate location. Sadly to some people it’s now more visible than when it was on the dome. It is only a 3 ft square flag. Compared to a huge slave monument on the statehouse grounds. Which of the 2 resembles and reminds people of a once slave nation north and south. We do not hold the USA flag accountable for slavery. Why not? The confederacy only existed for 4 years. Why not honor all of history for each and every accomplishments black white or whichever race. Blame game is always against the south and it’s people. I for one have many ancestors from all wars and the confederate army. If blacks can honor Martin Luther king and Malcolm x or tupac. Why can’t I honor my heritage without a label. South Carolina should not be held by demands of a compromise that was reached in 2000. It is finished and it’s at an honorable location. Be content that it’s off the dome and leave it be. It’s only a publicity stunt to get more black votes or whomever who don’t agrees votes. Perhaps read history and understand all points.

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TontoBubbaGoldstein October 10, 2014 at 9:20 pm

It’s like deja vu all over again.

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TontoBubbaGoldstein October 10, 2014 at 9:24 pm

Those who want the Confederate flag to remain atop the Capitol …

An impossibility.
Have you been afuckingsleep for the past 15 years?

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delbert norquest October 11, 2014 at 7:02 am

If you spit on the rebel flag in South Carolina-Would that be a felony or a misdemeanor?

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Commonman October 11, 2014 at 8:50 am

Smirks, well said. And many of these politicians use the flag (bring it down and keep it up) to get elected and re-elected. Lets move on and govern responsibly rather than whining about where a flag is placed.

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GamecockTRD October 13, 2014 at 12:26 pm

The funny thing is that if they ran the first national flag up the pole most of the uneducated people that protest against it, listening only to the talking heads, wouldn’t know what it was and probably just think it was an old version of the American flag.

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Ted E Bear October 13, 2014 at 1:51 pm

to the writer of this article: may whatever god you believe in, have mercy on your soul

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Lunelle Siegel July 4, 2015 at 11:17 am

Why does the NAACP and their lackeys GET TO DEFINE A HISTORICAL AMERICAN FLAG?

TELL THE SC LEGISLATURE NOT TO NEGOTIATE WITH THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF CERTAIN PEOPLE.

TAKE BACK OUR FLAG. PLEASE SIGN THIS PEITITION:
https://www.change.org/p/south-carolina-state-house-south-carolina-state-senate-south-carolina-governor-demand-the-naacp-rescind-their-odious-blight-on-the-universe-resolution-before-any-debate-on-removing-the-sc-confederate-veterans-memorial-flag

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