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Ralph Norman Didn’t Always Think Resigning Early Was A Good Idea

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LAWMAKER PREVIOUSLY SAID IT WASN’T “RIGHT TO LEAVE IN THE MIDDLE OF A TERM”

Former S.C. Rep. Ralph Norman made good on his pledge to resign from the State House of Representatives last week – saying his decision to step down in pursuit of higher office would save taxpayers “around $35,000.”

That’s the cost of a special election for Norman’s S.C. House district (map) – a race which will now be held on the same day as the special election for South Carolina’s fifth congressional district.

Norman is one of six announced GOP candidates for this congressional seat – which was vacated last week by new White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) director Mick Mulvaney.  Norman ran unsuccessfully for this congressional seat back in 2006 against former U.S. budget chairman John Spratt – whom Mulvaney later vanquished during the Tea Party wave election of 2010.

As for his seat in the S.C. House, Norman served from 2005-06 – and then again from 2009-2017.  Of interest?  While campaigning for reelection in 2009, he offered some starkly different thoughts when it came to the issue of elected officials resigning office prematurely.

“I don’t think it’s right to leave in the middle of a term. I’d finish it out,” Norman said at the time.

Hmmmm …

Norman has made some serious political hay off of his decision to step down early … after previously making political hay saying he didn’t think it was right to step down early.

Typical politician, huh?

Also running for this seat?  Former S.C. Republican party chairman Chad Connelly of Prosperity, social conservative activist Sheri Few of Lugoff, Camden businessman and State Guard leader Tom Mullikin, S.C. Speaker pro tempore Tommy Pope of York and attorney Kris Wampler of Indian Land.

No Democrats have announced for the upcoming partisan primary elections, which are scheduled for May 2.

(Banner via Travis Bell Photography)

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