SC

CSOL Drama: The Latest

Fallout continues to ripple across the South Carolina Lowcountry in response to the Charleston School of Law (CSOL)’s controversial decision to partner with InfiLaw – an entity of dubious report specializing in the creation of what critics refer to as “diploma mills.” News of this arrangement – which broke exclusively…

Fallout continues to ripple across the South Carolina Lowcountry in response to the Charleston School of Law (CSOL)’s controversial decision to partner with InfiLaw – an entity of dubious report specializing in the creation of what critics refer to as “diploma mills.”

News of this arrangement – which broke exclusively on FITS –  has alumni, faculty, staffers and students up in arms. And since our most recent report, we’ve learned things have deteriorated even further.

Last week, disagreement among the school’s board of directors over the deal caused Judge Alex Sanders and fellow founder Ralph McCullough to resign in protest. Now, former magistrate George Kosko is running the school – but not for long. According to our sources, CSOL will invite C. Peter Goplerud III – a less-than-distinguished sports lawyer from Oklahoma – to run the “institution.”

Yeah. We can’t wait to see how that announcement goes over …

We’ve also learned Charleston, S.C. mayor Joe Riley – who voiced his support for the controversial deal – has negotiated a secret deal with InfiLaw in which the company is promising to develop several properties in the immediate vicinity of the school. Accordingly, as one source tells us, his advocacy on behalf of the deal “cannot be viewed as genuinely in the interest of the law school.”

As we noted in our initial report, the timing of the CSOL announcement was especially bad for current students – as a critical July 15 transfer deadline had already passed. Now the school is going out of its way to make it even harder for students to get out. According to our sources, CSOL’s dean – Andy Abrams – is holding up the transfer process by requiring each student who wishes to leave the school to meet with him personally to explain their reasons.

That’s super shady, people.

Anyway, stay tuned for more on this rapidly unraveling mess in the days ahead …

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116 comments

Lewis July 29, 2013 at 8:52 am

If Ralph and Elizabeth are involved, it’s about the money – for them and them only.

Reply
Bob July 29, 2013 at 9:07 am

ABSOFREAKINLUTELY – he has to be 100% behind it – he’d be the one to craft the deal then “resign in protest” – he’s the poster child for “mediocre mind” making money as a lawyer

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anon July 29, 2013 at 8:44 pm

Lewis and Bob, you must be the biggest assholes on the face of the planet. The McCulloughs are beloved at CSOL. NO ONE teaches article 9 better than Elizabeth. And Mr. McCullough is as sweet as can be. It sounds like you are a bitter *&^%head and probably lost a case to or before him. Concentrate on your lawyering rather than your douchebaggery. And yes, THAT is a technical term.

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bob July 30, 2013 at 7:53 am

but then again “anon” you attend a legal diploma mill….what could you possibly know about anything?

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Lewis July 30, 2013 at 2:37 pm

There was a time when I thought they were good folks also. Then I got to know them.

Lewis July 29, 2013 at 8:52 am

If Ralph and Elizabeth are involved, it’s about the money – for them and them only.

Reply
Bob July 29, 2013 at 9:07 am

ABSOFREAKINLUTELY – he has to be 100% behind it – he’d be the one to craft the deal then “resign in protest” – he’s the poster child for “mediocre mind” making money as a lawyer

Reply
anon July 29, 2013 at 8:44 pm

Lewis and Bob, you must be the biggest assholes on the face of the planet. The McCulloughs are beloved at CSOL. NO ONE teaches article 9 better than Elizabeth. And Mr. McCullough is as sweet as can be. It sounds like you are a bitter *&^%head and probably lost a case to or before him. Concentrate on your lawyering rather than your douchebaggery. And yes, THAT is a technical term.

Reply
bob July 30, 2013 at 7:53 am

but then again “anon” you attend a legal diploma mill….what could you possibly know about anything?

Reply
Lewis July 30, 2013 at 2:37 pm

There was a time when I thought they were good folks also. Then I got to know them.

TontoBubbaGoldstein July 29, 2013 at 8:53 am

Whoa….UR joking with TBG, yes?

LBJ using his influence to personally benefit from a real estate deal?

Say it ain’t so, Joe.

/sarcasm

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TontoBubbaGoldstein July 29, 2013 at 8:53 am

Whoa….UR joking with TBG, yes?

LBJ using his influence to personally benefit from a real estate deal?

Say it ain’t so, Joe.

/sarcasm

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GreenvilleLwyr July 29, 2013 at 9:10 am

Will the bathrooms stock law degrees from InfiLaw schools for use as toilet paper?

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GreenvilleLwyr July 29, 2013 at 9:10 am

Will the bathrooms stock law degrees from InfiLaw schools for use as toilet paper?

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Aloha Steve July 29, 2013 at 9:27 am

Why would Joe Riley give a rats ass about the well-being of the CSOL? He shouldn’t and anybody who thinks he should is crazy. He isn’t an owner, board member, etc. Of course they are looking at developing several properties in Charleston because that is what InfiLaw does–jack up enrollment numbers to 2 or 3 times what they are now. That is how diploma mills work.

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Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:32 am

All schools are diploma mills these days.

Reply
Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:36 am

He doesn’t. He cares about developing property downtown.

Reply
9" July 30, 2013 at 2:22 pm Reply
hack July 29, 2013 at 11:47 am

What a great way to bring capital to the Charleston economy, even if the capital brought is in the form of student loan debt. Illusory growth since no one really gets richer in the long term, but Charleston gets more tax revenue due to the increased property values and increased consumption of having more students using their loans as “stimulus.” This is how misallocation of capital creates the illusion of wealth being created despite no saved (only debt) capital being used.

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Aloha Steve July 29, 2013 at 9:27 am

Why would Joe Riley give a rats ass about the well-being of the CSOL? He shouldn’t and anybody who thinks he should is crazy. He isn’t an owner, board member, etc. Of course they are looking at developing several properties in Charleston because that is what InfiLaw does–jack up enrollment numbers to 2 or 3 times what they are now. That is how diploma mills work.

Reply
Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:32 am

All schools are diploma mills these days.

Reply
Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:36 am

He doesn’t. He cares about developing property downtown.

Reply
9" July 30, 2013 at 2:22 pm Reply
hack July 29, 2013 at 11:47 am

What a great way to bring capital to the Charleston economy, even if the capital brought is in the form of student loan debt. Illusory growth since no one really gets richer in the long term, but Charleston gets more tax revenue due to the increased property values and increased consumption of having more students using their loans as “stimulus.” This is how misallocation of capital creates the illusion of wealth being created despite no saved (only debt) capital being used.

Reply
Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:28 am

The legislature should act to prevent grads from CSOL that will graduate 3 years from now from sitting for the bar in South Carolina. Problem solved.

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Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:30 am

Anyone feeling confident enough to test should be allowed to do so.

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Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:32 am

Yeah, because what South Carolina needs is MOAR people calling themselves lawyers.

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Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:32 am

I could give a crap if the whole damn state held a law degree.

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Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:36 am

Which is why your opinion on who should take the bar is worthless.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:37 am

Fuck that. Oh wait. You’re one of those ‘conservative’ Repuklicrats that would never endorse anything but “Free Trade” and “Open Markets” right?

Edit: You’re not at all “Protectionist” are you?

Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:39 am

No. I’m someone with a brain and who uses it. I suggest you try it sometime.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:41 am

Well explain yourself? Why do you care who gets a law degree? What the fuck do you care, seriously?

Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:45 am

I’m not going to waste my time using logic and reason to explain my positions to a simpleton who feels the need to use “fuck” in every sentence. Here’s a hint- your position isn’t more justified or correct because you curse. Grow up some, son, and maybe I’ll engage you in an intelligent debate.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:48 am

Oh yes sir. You are absolutely correct. Please forgive me my insolence. Let me try to rephrase my question in a more delicate manner.

1. Does SC have reciprocal licensing agreements with other states, and
2. Would that not allow me to come to this state, by virtue of my license in another state, to practice law here after the basic application requirements.

I truly humbly await your wise and kind decision my lord.

Cope101 July 29, 2013 at 9:55 am

1. No. SC does not reciprocate other state’s bar exams
2. So, no you’re not allowed to practice law here unless you pass the bar exam.

3. Can’t take the bar exam unless you have a law degree from an ABA approved law school

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 10:18 am

Have to take your word for It. I tried. I’m sure it can be done, thought it’s probably reciprocal to a judges back pocket. bunch o’ filth

lawyer July 29, 2013 at 11:06 am

No reciprocation, even for already licensed attorneys.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 11:16 am

Not doubting. Very fracking protectionist. Whole damn state gubmint ought to be dumped for a mulligan. Thanks

darksied calling July 29, 2013 at 12:32 pm

Frank, hate to tell you this put its pretty much ABA/state standard across the country. Just because one passed their respective state bar, is liscensed and insured and practicing in good standard in their home state means nothing in another. I live in SC but practice in Al, GA and TN. But I can not represent anyone in SC as I am not a memember of the SC bar. Hell I had a SC judge “strongly encourage” me to be careful of what I say to friends and family as it could be perceivd as the unauthorized practice of law in SC.

Kickin Chickin July 29, 2013 at 1:23 pm

Some states do have reciprocity – for instance, in Texas you can be admitted without taking the bar exam if you are a member in good standing in at least one other state and have been actively practicing law for for at least five of the past seven years.

Jesus H. Christ July 29, 2013 at 3:16 pm

Please don’t bother Frank Pytel, professional comment thread hijacker, with your pesky facts.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 10:19 am

Actually I asked about already licensed atty’s not other states exams.

mph July 29, 2013 at 10:56 am

Just curious: How do you calculate MOAR people?

Reply
Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:28 am

The legislature should act to prevent grads from CSOL that will graduate 3 years from now from sitting for the bar in South Carolina. Problem solved.

Reply
Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:30 am

Anyone feeling confident enough to test should be allowed to do so.

Reply
Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:32 am

Yeah, because what South Carolina needs is MOAR people calling themselves lawyers.

Reply
Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:32 am

I could give a crap if the whole damn state held a law degree.

Reply
Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:36 am

Which is why your opinion on who should take the bar is worthless.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:37 am

Fuck that. Oh wait. You’re one of those ‘conservative’ Repuklicrats that would never endorse anything but “Free Trade” and “Open Markets” right?

Edit: You’re not at all “Protectionist” are you?

Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:39 am

No. I’m someone with a brain and who uses it. I suggest you try it sometime.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:41 am

Well explain yourself? Why do you care who gets a law degree? What the fuck do you care, seriously?

Jackie Chiles July 29, 2013 at 9:45 am

I’m not going to waste my time using logic and reason to explain my positions to a simpleton who feels the need to use “fuck” in every sentence. Here’s a hint- your position isn’t more justified or correct because you curse. Grow up some, son, and maybe I’ll engage you in an intelligent debate.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:48 am

Oh yes sir. You are absolutely correct. Please forgive me my insolence. Let me try to rephrase my question in a more delicate manner.

1. Does SC have reciprocal licensing agreements with other states, and
2. Would that not allow me to come to this state, by virtue of my license in another state, to practice law here after the basic application requirements.

I truly humbly await your wise and kind decision my lord.

Cope101 July 29, 2013 at 9:55 am

1. No. SC does not reciprocate other state’s bar exams
2. So, no you’re not allowed to practice law here unless you pass the bar exam.

3. Can’t take the bar exam unless you have a law degree from an ABA approved law school

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 10:18 am

Have to take your word for It. I tried. I’m sure it can be done, thought it’s probably reciprocal to a judges back pocket. bunch o’ filth

lawyer July 29, 2013 at 11:06 am

No reciprocation, even for already licensed attorneys.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 11:16 am

Not doubting. Very fracking protectionist. Whole damn state gubmint ought to be dumped for a mulligan. Thanks

darksied calling July 29, 2013 at 12:32 pm

Frank, hate to tell you this put its pretty much ABA/state standard across the country. Just because one passed their respective state bar, is liscensed and insured and practicing in good standard in their home state means nothing in another. I live in SC but practice in Al, GA and TN. But I can not represent anyone in SC as I am not a memember of the SC bar. Hell I had a SC judge “strongly encourage” me to be careful of what I say to friends and family as it could be perceivd as the unauthorized practice of law in SC.

Kickin Chickin July 29, 2013 at 1:23 pm

Some states do have reciprocity – for instance, in Texas you can be admitted without taking the bar exam if you are a member in good standing in at least one other state and have been actively practicing law for for at least five of the past seven years.

Jesus H. Christ July 29, 2013 at 3:16 pm

Please don’t bother Frank Pytel, professional comment thread hijacker, with your pesky facts.

Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 10:19 am

Actually I asked about already licensed atty’s not other states exams.

mph July 29, 2013 at 10:56 am

Just curious: How do you calculate MOAR people?

Reply
Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:29 am

Can someone confirm if I have missed something. My understanding is that not long ago somebody that founded the place go the boot? Now that person has sold this place to ‘pond scum?’ and the locals are bitching because the guy that got the boot fucked them over?

Is that right?

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Frank Pytel July 29, 2013 at 9:29 am

Can someone confirm if I have missed something. My understanding is that not long ago somebody that founded the place go the boot? Now that person has sold this place to ‘pond scum?’ and the locals are bitching because the guy that got the boot fucked them over?

Is that right?

Reply
Smirks July 29, 2013 at 10:36 am

I’d LOVE a personal meeting to explain why I’d be leaving this place. Hell yes, a time and place to direct unbridled fury at this stuff!

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Smirks July 29, 2013 at 10:36 am

I’d LOVE a personal meeting to explain why I’d be leaving this place. Hell yes, a time and place to direct unbridled fury at this stuff!

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Misstate July 29, 2013 at 10:43 am

Nice reporting–however who at CSOL was actually behind this deal? Who was pushing for it? What do they have to gain. Interesting that Sanders and McCulloch resigned over it but give us the rest of the story.

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anon July 29, 2013 at 8:38 pm

Sanders and McCullough DISSENTED to the deal. Upon dissent to an extraordinary corporate act, the supporting board members have the right to redeem the dissenter’s shares. You should really think before you talk…..

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Misstate July 30, 2013 at 10:59 am

You really should work on your reading comprehension skills. Also, i wasn’t talking, I was typing. I wish that when I talked, my words would miraculously appear on the type-written screen; however, I have not mastered that ability yet.

The article states “the deal caused Judge Alex Sanders and fellow founder Ralph McCullough to resign in protest”

Where does it say they “DISSENTED” (i guess it is supposed to be in all caps because that makes it more impressive that you know that.)

The article doesn’t say that which is why i asked a question and asked for the rest of the story. Had the article stated they dissented and redeemed their shares, then I would have been more informed and the need for my question would be moot.

You obviously have inside information and based on your lack of logic and reading comprehension I can only surmise that you are a student at the CSOL. Or you are just a douchebag.

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Misstate July 29, 2013 at 10:43 am

Nice reporting–however who at CSOL was actually behind this deal? Who was pushing for it? What do they have to gain. Interesting that Sanders and McCulloch resigned over it but give us the rest of the story.

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anon July 29, 2013 at 8:38 pm

Sanders and McCullough DISSENTED to the deal. Upon dissent to an extraordinary corporate act, the supporting board members have the right to redeem the dissenter’s shares. You should really think before you talk…..

Reply
Misstate July 30, 2013 at 10:59 am

You really should work on your reading comprehension skills. Also, i wasn’t talking, I was typing. I wish that when I talked, my words would miraculously appear on the type-written screen; however, I have not mastered that ability yet.

The article states “the deal caused Judge Alex Sanders and fellow founder Ralph McCullough to resign in protest”

Where does it say they “DISSENTED” (i guess it is supposed to be in all caps because that makes it more impressive that you know that.)

The article doesn’t say that which is why i asked a question and asked for the rest of the story. Had the article stated they dissented and redeemed their shares, then I would have been more informed and the need for my question would be moot.

You obviously have inside information and based on your lack of logic and reading comprehension I can only surmise that you are a student at the CSOL. Or you are just a douchebag.

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hack July 29, 2013 at 10:59 am

Looks like Joe is privy to the deal to keep his gentrification machine running in that part of the peninsula. The upper King area has certainly cleaned up since the law school got there. In 2006, being in any area north of the law school or O’Malleys after dark was asking for a mugging. Thanks to hipster/coed colonization of the past 7 years, you can now bar hop and look trendy all the way to the Recovery Room while only being accosted by as few as 2 or 3 crackheads during the day. The frequency will triple when night falls however.

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hack July 29, 2013 at 10:59 am

Looks like Joe is privy to the deal to keep his gentrification machine running in that part of the peninsula. The upper King area has certainly cleaned up since the law school got there. In 2006, being in any area north of the law school or O’Malleys after dark was asking for a mugging. Thanks to hipster/coed colonization of the past 7 years, you can now bar hop and look trendy all the way to the Recovery Room while only being accosted by as few as 2 or 3 crackheads during the day. The frequency will triple when night falls however.

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Robert Jackson July 29, 2013 at 11:14 am

As a for-profit institution CSOL has a different model than a non-profit school would.
First, their ideal student is someone who is motivated to attend, but lacks qualification to go to a non-profit (like USC). That way they can charge double the tuition.
As the number of applicants increase CSOL will want to increase enrollment. They won’t have the option of increasing admission requirements since better qualified applicants won’t enroll in sufficient numbers due to the substantial differences in tuition.
Everyone in practice knows that CSOL is a diploma mill anyway. Everyone in practice also knows that people who are smart enough would go to USC if they had a choice (exception being the CSOL evening program part-time students).

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Cope101 July 29, 2013 at 11:36 am

I do know a couple people who could have gone to USC, but chose CSOL instead (because they “like Charleston better than Columbia”). They’ve got to be hating that decision now though

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Check it July 29, 2013 at 1:33 pm

Picking a law school for the comparative lovability of its location rather than the quality of education it provides says volumes about the judgment if not intellegence of those who picked CSOL over USC. Granted, if you lived in Charleston and wanted to practice there after graduation, it would only make sense to to to CSOL because it would give you an edge in integrating into the Charleston legal community in some ways. But to otherwise pick CSOL over USC shows a level of thinking best suited for a 5th tier law school.

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Jesus H. Christ! July 29, 2013 at 3:14 pm

Heck, I doubt that a CSOL degree gives anyone an edge anywhere, even in Charleston.

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CSOLALUM July 30, 2013 at 8:46 am

I attended CSOL and had professors like Nathan Crystal and Steve Spitz, both former long-time USC professors and SC titans of jurisprudence. Some, not all, got a fairly decent legal education at CSOL, at least comparable to USC. At the time I chose, the difference in quality of education was at least up for debate. Those professors; however, are either gone or on their way out.

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Misstate July 30, 2013 at 11:02 am

The Law is a business. Picking a Law School based on the fact that girls are pretty in Charleston and I like the beaches is a tremendously bad business decision.

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Robert Jackson July 29, 2013 at 11:14 am

As a for-profit institution CSOL has a different model than a non-profit school would.
First, their ideal student is someone who is motivated to attend, but lacks qualification to go to a non-profit (like USC). That way they can charge double the tuition.
As the number of applicants increase CSOL will want to increase enrollment. They won’t have the option of increasing admission requirements since better qualified applicants won’t enroll in sufficient numbers due to the substantial differences in tuition.
Everyone in practice knows that CSOL is a diploma mill anyway. Everyone in practice also knows that people who are smart enough would go to USC if they had a choice (exception being the CSOL evening program part-time students).

Reply
Cope101 July 29, 2013 at 11:36 am

I do know a couple people who could have gone to USC, but chose CSOL instead (because they “like Charleston better than Columbia”). They’ve got to be hating that decision now though

Reply
Check it July 29, 2013 at 1:33 pm

Picking a law school for the comparative lovability of its location rather than the quality of education it provides says volumes about the judgment if not intellegence of those who picked CSOL over USC. Granted, if you lived in Charleston and wanted to practice there after graduation, it would only make sense to to to CSOL because it would give you an edge in integrating into the Charleston legal community in some ways. But to otherwise pick CSOL over USC shows a level of thinking best suited for a 5th tier law school.

Reply
Jesus H. Christ! July 29, 2013 at 3:14 pm

Heck, I doubt that a CSOL degree gives anyone an edge anywhere, even in Charleston.

Reply
CSOLALUM July 30, 2013 at 8:46 am

I attended CSOL and had professors like Nathan Crystal and Steve Spitz, both former long-time USC professors and SC titans of jurisprudence. Some, not all, got a fairly decent legal education at CSOL, at least comparable to USC. At the time I chose, the difference in quality of education was at least up for debate. Those professors; however, are either gone or on their way out.

Reply
Misstate July 30, 2013 at 11:02 am

The Law is a business. Picking a Law School based on the fact that girls are pretty in Charleston and I like the beaches is a tremendously bad business decision.

Reply
Disappointed July 29, 2013 at 12:50 pm

3L at CSOL here.. I got into USC, and a lot of other schools. CSOL gave me a lot of scholarship $. I love charleston. I’m from Charleston. I’ve received a wonderful education at CSOL. Its just a shame my degree will never reflect that. I would have never even considered this school if I’d known it would go the way of Pheonix Law. We have been sold down the river.

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GreenvilleLwyr July 29, 2013 at 2:35 pm

Don’t worry. You can always be my paralegal.

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Disappointed July 29, 2013 at 12:50 pm

3L at CSOL here.. I got into USC, and a lot of other schools. CSOL gave me a lot of scholarship $. I love charleston. I’m from Charleston. I’ve received a wonderful education at CSOL. Its just a shame my degree will never reflect that. I would have never even considered this school if I’d known it would go the way of Pheonix Law. We have been sold down the river.

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GreenvilleLwyr July 29, 2013 at 2:35 pm

Don’t worry. You can always be my paralegal.

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Charleston Law Skool Grad July 29, 2013 at 1:28 pm

The timing was also bad in that the Class of 2013 and probably quite a few from previous graduating classes were taking the bar exam during the week that the news broke.

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Charleston Law Skool Grad July 29, 2013 at 1:28 pm

The timing was also bad in that the Class of 2013 and probably quite a few from previous graduating classes were taking the bar exam during the week that the news broke.

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wally July 29, 2013 at 2:11 pm

I feel sorry for all those medical residents who are neck-deep in hundreds of thousands in med school debt only to be staring at Obamacare….poor schlubs…

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wally July 29, 2013 at 2:11 pm

I feel sorry for all those medical residents who are neck-deep in hundreds of thousands in med school debt only to be staring at Obamacare….poor schlubs…

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Jesus H. Christ! July 29, 2013 at 3:11 pm

“We’ve also learned Charleston, S.C. mayor Joe Riley – who voiced his support for the controversial deal – has negotiated a secret deal with InfiLaw in which the company is promising to develop several properties in the immediate vicinity of the school. ”
According to the Charleston P&C, Riley permitted the sale of a prime piece of property to this for-profit school at a well below market price long before this Infilaw deal was in the works.

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Jesus H. Christ! July 29, 2013 at 3:11 pm

“We’ve also learned Charleston, S.C. mayor Joe Riley – who voiced his support for the controversial deal – has negotiated a secret deal with InfiLaw in which the company is promising to develop several properties in the immediate vicinity of the school. ”
According to the Charleston P&C, Riley permitted the sale of a prime piece of property to this for-profit school at a well below market price long before this Infilaw deal was in the works.

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Not Surprised July 29, 2013 at 4:40 pm

Wow. Obviously most of the people leaving comments on these CSOL-related articles have Zero idea that CSOL is unique, and not a “poor decision” for a law school. How many of you idiots bashing the school are aware that CSOL is one of the ONLY 2 schools in the nation which offers an Maritime LLM degree? From the looks of it… None. Unless you’ve attended the school, you obviously have no idea what you’re talking about when it comes to the curriculum, Professors and quality of education this school includes. Too many people on this page think they know what they’re talking about. Is it coincidental than only a rare few of you will even hold an LLM degree in your careers as a “prominent attorney”? Nope. Not in the slightest.

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Bill July 29, 2013 at 6:05 pm

When Alex Sanders and Ralph McCullough resigned the school lost all its academic credibility. They would not have left if they did not believe the change was bad for the School and that the School would reflect badly on them.
The fact the school offers a particular degree doesn’t mean the program is a good program. There are virtually no Maritime LLM programs in the US because there is little demand for the specialty in the US. Given the small level of demand for that specialty, if I were going to go that route I would sure shoot for an LLM from Tulane and not the CSOL.

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Not Surprised July 29, 2013 at 7:19 pm

Correction, Bill. The fact that the school offers the degree, which is one of THE most UNcommon degrees in all the nation signifies that YES, CSOL Does have what it takes. It is unique in one of the specialist ways a law school can stand out in a nation full of “too many lawyers”. Or have you not noticed that Charleston is home to one of the deepest ports in the entire nation? It is literally a powerhouse in terms of everything Maritime. The only larger powerhouse is in New Orleans, because (as many of you don’t know and will never grasp the concept of), Louisiana isn’t just under normal “American” law, it is regulated under the Civil Code. For those of you currently scratching your head, No, this isn’t “common law”. This is law orchestrated and originating under Roman, Spanish and French law. Bill, if you knew ANYTHING about Charleston’s Maritime attorneys and law (which even most Judges have the hardest time wrapping their heads around), then you would understand that the Maritime LLM program is one of the most prestigious programs that ever could have originated in this, or any other school. Nevermind Torts, Criminal, Property, Family and the rest of the “basic” elements of law… this is above and beyond everything you ever learned. Sure, you can get your license to practice in different STATES within the U.S., but until you grasp what it means to practice Maritime law, and learn the rules of the International Judicial System, you’re still small time. Win all of your cases, or lose them all. You’ll never experience what it’s like to be truly great until you practice on an International scale. THAT is what this school means to me. Charleston’s Maritime/Admiralty attorneys are some of THE BEST lawyers any licensed attorney anyone will ever encounter. They have not only survived, they have succeeded; and on an aspirational level might I add. These are the attorneys who are present in our school. These are the attorneys who teach our students the ropes. And THESE are the attorneys who will teach our students to wipe up the floor with every other attorney across the United States who thinks that they “have what it takes” when it comes to a maritime case.

Read it and weep, Ladies and Gentlemen. You can smash and bash our school all you want, but when push comes to shove, CSOL is better than any of you give it credit for. And that’s the way we prefer it.

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trolljamz July 29, 2013 at 11:37 pm

True, there aren’t many maritime llm programs in the US. The fact that CSOL *offers* one doesn’t make it prestigious, let alone reputable. Everybody knows Tulane is where its at for admiralty. There or the UK. Not so much Charleston. Sorry.

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Carlos Danger July 30, 2013 at 12:12 pm

Well, I think he has done an excellent job of convincing himself of that.

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Bill July 30, 2013 at 2:17 pm

Well, that settles it. I suggest you put that on your resume.

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Misstate July 30, 2013 at 5:57 pm

is there a large market and demand for a maritime LLM?

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Not Surprised July 29, 2013 at 4:40 pm

Wow. Obviously most of the people leaving comments on these CSOL-related articles have Zero idea that CSOL is unique, and not a “poor decision” for a law school. How many of you idiots bashing the school are aware that CSOL is one of the ONLY 2 schools in the nation which offers an Maritime LLM degree? From the looks of it… None. Unless you’ve attended the school, you obviously have no idea what you’re talking about when it comes to the curriculum, Professors and quality of education this school includes. Too many people on this page think they know what they’re talking about. Is it coincidental than only a rare few of you will even hold an LLM degree in your careers as a “prominent attorney”? Nope. Not in the slightest.

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Bill July 29, 2013 at 6:05 pm

When Alex Sanders and Ralph McCullough resigned the school lost all its academic credibility. They would not have left if they did not believe the change was bad for the School and that the School would reflect badly on them.
The fact the school offers a particular degree doesn’t mean the program is a good program. There are virtually no Maritime LLM programs in the US because there is little demand for the specialty in the US. Given the small level of demand for that specialty, if I were going to go that route I would sure shoot for an LLM from Tulane and not the CSOL.

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Not Surprised July 29, 2013 at 7:19 pm

Correction, Bill. The fact that the school offers the degree, which is one of THE most UNcommon degrees in all the nation signifies that YES, CSOL Does have what it takes. It is unique in one of the specialist ways a law school can stand out in a nation full of “too many lawyers”. Or have you not noticed that Charleston is home to one of the deepest ports in the entire nation? It is literally a powerhouse in terms of everything Maritime. The only larger powerhouse is in New Orleans, because (as many of you don’t know and will never grasp the concept of), Louisiana isn’t just under normal “American” law, it is regulated under the Civil Code. For those of you currently scratching your head, No, this isn’t “common law”. This is law orchestrated and originating under Roman, Spanish and French law. Bill, if you knew ANYTHING about Charleston’s Maritime attorneys and law (which even most Judges have the hardest time wrapping their heads around), then you would understand that the Maritime LLM program is one of the most prestigious programs that ever could have originated in this, or any other school. Nevermind Torts, Criminal, Property, Family and the rest of the “basic” elements of law… this is above and beyond everything you ever learned. Sure, you can get your license to practice in different STATES within the U.S., but until you grasp what it means to practice Maritime law, and learn the rules of the International Judicial System, you’re still small time. Win all of your cases, or lose them all. You’ll never experience what it’s like to be truly great until you practice on an International scale. THAT is what this school means to me. Charleston’s Maritime/Admiralty attorneys are some of THE BEST lawyers any licensed attorney anyone will ever encounter. They have not only survived, they have succeeded; and on an aspirational level might I add. These are the attorneys who are present in our school. These are the attorneys who teach our students the ropes. And THESE are the attorneys who will teach our students to wipe up the floor with every other attorney across the United States who thinks that they “have what it takes” when it comes to a maritime case.

Read it and weep, Ladies and Gentlemen. You can smash and bash our school all you want, but when push comes to shove, CSOL is better than any of you give it credit for. And that’s the way we prefer it.

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trolljamz July 29, 2013 at 11:37 pm

hmm

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Carlos Danger July 30, 2013 at 12:12 pm

Well, I think he has done an excellent job of convincing himself of that.

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Bill July 30, 2013 at 2:17 pm

Well, that settles it. I suggest you put that on your resume.

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Misstate July 30, 2013 at 5:57 pm

is there a large market and demand for a maritime LLM?

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Misstate July 30, 2013 at 11:05 am

Graduates of the CSOL already had dismal prospects of obtaining employment at anywhere other than the free wifi at starbucks with their little laptops. I can’t imagine any job offers will be extended to anyone now.

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Misstate July 30, 2013 at 11:05 am

Graduates of the CSOL already had dismal prospects of obtaining employment at anywhere other than the free wifi at starbucks with their little laptops. I can’t imagine any job offers will be extended to anyone now.

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RHood2 July 30, 2013 at 2:25 pm

Hey, all the students who want out should line up all at once to meet with him personally. Stupid move on his part because even if it is just th students getting ab appointment with gphis secretary, it would create a great visual. Maybe they shoul wear parachutes or have Geronimo signs or something to drive the point home.

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RHood2 July 30, 2013 at 2:25 pm

Hey, all the students who want out should line up all at once to meet with him personally. Stupid move on his part because even if it is just th students getting ab appointment with gphis secretary, it would create a great visual. Maybe they shoul wear parachutes or have Geronimo signs or something to drive the point home.

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James July 30, 2013 at 6:11 pm

I’m not seeing the problem.

CSOL was overpriced and had bad employment stats long before they signed up with Infilaw. Students weren’t getting jobs and those who weren’t getting jobs couldn’t make enough to pay down their debt.

For-profit/non-profit is a meaningless distinction in the law school context. Either the “profits” are going to pay salaries and perks of a cabal of tenured faculty/admins or they are going to shareholders. Either way, it’s the students who pay up.

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James July 30, 2013 at 6:11 pm

I’m not seeing the problem.

CSOL was overpriced and had bad employment stats long before they signed up with Infilaw. Students weren’t getting jobs and those who weren’t getting jobs couldn’t make enough to pay down their debt.

For-profit/non-profit is a meaningless distinction in the law school context. Either the “profits” are going to pay salaries and perks of a cabal of tenured faculty/admins or they are going to shareholders. Either way, it’s the students who pay up.

Reply

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