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Bizarre CSOL Ruling

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REINSTATEMENT ORDER RAISES QUESTIONS …

|| By FITSNEWS || Against all odds – and despite the best efforts of its detractors – the Charleston School of Law (CSOL) is still standing. Not only that, the private institution is set to welcome a new class of students this fall thanks to budget-saving measures implemented by its leaders earlier this year.

CSOL consolidated its facilities and used buyouts, voluntary separation packages and attrition to “right-size” its staff consistent with reduced enrollment (part of a nationwide trend) – but in the end seven positions still had to be cut.

Those necessary cuts have prompted legal action against the school – and a bizarre ruling on behalf of one of the plaintiffs.

S.C. circuit court judge Markley Dennis recently reinstated Nancy Zisk – one of the CSOL professors suing the school.

Zisk makes $129,000 a year not counting benefits.

Wait … can a judge really do that?  Reinstate a person like that?  Dennis evidently thinks so.  Not only that, an attorney for another of the fired professors said the judge’s ruling meant all of them could “go back if they wanted.”

Seriously? 

This is insane.  A proposed government takeover of CSOL is one of the reasons the school is in its current predicament – and now the government is stepping in to dictate which employees the institution is permitted to fire?  And on what grounds?

Ridiculous …

CSOL is a private institution.  As such, it should have the right to hire and fire based on whatever criteria it chooses.  And last time we checked, “keeping the doors open” was a compelling criteria.

According to the school’s attorneys, Dennis’ ruling could “significantly and negatively impact the continued operation of the CSOL and the legal education of hundreds of students.”

Sources familiar with the school’s financial situation confirmed that assessment … but no matter what CSOL’s fiscal outlook is, this is the private sector.

Government doesn’t get to make these decisions.

We understand government’s desire to run unsustainable bureaucracies.  And we understand its desire to destroy commercial enterprise via the taxpayer subsidization of such unsustainable bureaucracies.

But this?  Mandating a private business operate in a fiscally unsustainable fashion?

That’s a new one on us …

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