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Why “House Of Cards” Is Good For South Carolina

For those of you who haven’t watched the new Netflix original series House of Cards yet, you need to put it in your queue. And if you’re not on Netflix, we can’t think of a better reason to spring for the $7.99 monthly subscription (which gives you access to unlimited…

For those of you who haven’t watched the new Netflix original series House of Cards yet, you need to put it in your queue. And if you’re not on Netflix, we can’t think of a better reason to spring for the $7.99 monthly subscription (which gives you access to unlimited movie and television shows on your television and all of your mobile devices).

If you’re a South Carolina politico, House of Cards is required viewing on multiple levels – not the least of which is the fact that its lead character is a U.S. Congressman from the Palmetto State’s fifth congressional district.

And if you live outside of our little upside down triangle by the sea, you’re about to be treated to something truly rare – a film depiction of a South Carolinian who can actually walk and chew gum at the same time.

Amazing, isn’t it?

Francis Underwood – the conniving congressman portrayed with ruthless dryness and remarkable depth by two-time Academy Award winner Kevin Spacey – is more than just an intelligent, opportunistic politician climbing the D.C. ladder. He’s literally the Michelangelo of Machiavellianism – an relentless, eternally adaptable schemer whose field of vision includes every conceivable chess move his opponents could make against him.

And he’s got plenty of games going simultaneously …

Let’s be clear: Underwood is a bad dude. In fact without spoiling the story line of the first season of House of Cards (released earlier this month in its entirety on Netflix), let’s just say the show’s promotional image featuring him in Abe Lincoln’s seat with blood on his hands isn’t entirely figurative.

Yet while Underwood is pure evil, he’s diabolically brilliant in pursuing his nefarious ends. In fact his mastery of multiple parallel games runs circles around numerous worthy adversaries – enabling him to pull the strings of power in the nation’s capital almost at will.

Simply put, this is the best we’ve seen Spacey since 1995’s Usual Suspects – but it’s the best we’ve seen a South Carolinian portrayed ever.

As an exclusively web-based streaming series we’re not sure which awards House of Cards is eligible to win, but the series should take home an armful of statues – starting with Spacey’s portrayal of Underwood.

But the real winner here is South Carolina – which has finally seen a native son (albeit a fictitious one) portrayed as something other than a thick-accented, intellectually incurious, morally compromised hillbilly.

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16 comments

Buz Martin February 12, 2013 at 2:18 am

Spacey is brilliant. Has a remarkable ear for dialect too. The show sounds great. Can’t wait to see it.

Reply
Anne Wiggins Smith February 15, 2013 at 11:00 pm

The show IS great. I went through all of the episodes in 5 nights, now I’m watching West Wing for the first time and amazed at how current the show is.

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Boz Martin February 12, 2013 at 1:18 am

Spacey is brilliant. Has a remarkable ear for dialect too. The show sounds great. Can’t wait to see it.

Reply
smithaw February 15, 2013 at 10:00 pm

The show IS great. I went through all of the episodes in 5 nights, now I’m watching West Wing for the first time and amazed at how current the show is.

Reply
Lewis February 12, 2013 at 9:14 am

“But the real winner here is South Carolina – which has finally seen a native son (albeit a fictitious one) portrayed as something other than a thick-accented, intellectually incurious, morally compromised ________.” As in Clyburn.

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Lewis February 12, 2013 at 8:14 am

“But the real winner here is South Carolina – which has finally seen a native son (albeit a fictitious one) portrayed as something other than a thick-accented, intellectually incurious, morally compromised ________.” As in Clyburn.

Reply
Gary Rhine February 12, 2013 at 10:05 am

I don’t think he has the accent quite right but the story is terrific Kind of a JR Carolina style.

Reply
Gary Rhine February 12, 2013 at 9:05 am

I don’t think he has the accent quite right but the story is terrific Kind of a JR Carolina style.

Reply
Swingline February 12, 2013 at 10:10 am

I was disappointed that the Citadel seemed to have turned down the opportunity to have it’s likeness more accurately portrayed. I get it, but I still think it detracted from that facet of the story.

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Swingline February 12, 2013 at 9:10 am

I was disappointed that the Citadel seemed to have turned down the opportunity to have it’s likeness more accurately portrayed. I get it, but I still think it detracted from that facet of the story.

Reply
CUvinny February 12, 2013 at 11:26 am

The first season was very good, the episode about the Peachoid cracked me up

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CUvinny February 12, 2013 at 10:26 am

The first season was very good, the episode about the Peachoid cracked me up

Reply
stickler February 12, 2013 at 4:16 pm

Anyone care to compare to the original 1990 BBC trilogy? Susannah Harker was quite sweet as the doomed political reporter, Mattie Storin.

Reply
tomstickler February 12, 2013 at 3:16 pm

Anyone care to compare to the original 1990 BBC trilogy? Susannah Harker was quite sweet as the doomed political reporter, Mattie Storin.

Reply
trey hall February 15, 2013 at 8:18 am

have you ever even been to South Carolina?

Reply
trey hall February 15, 2013 at 7:18 am

have you ever even been to South Carolina?

Reply

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