There’s an interesting experiment in democracy underway in South Carolina … with an unconventional candidate at its helm.

And no, we’re not referring to Thomas Ravenel – the Lowcountry, S.C. businessman who is challenging “Republican” Lindsey Graham.

As this website reported earlier this week, a petition candidate named Brandon Armstrong submitted more than 12,000 signatures to the S.C. Election Commission (SCEC).  Assuming at least 10,000 of those signatures are certified as valid, Armstrong will appear on the November ballot against U.S. Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.).

Who is Brandon Armstrong?  And what makes his candidacy so interesting?

First of all, Armstrong is a “she” not a “he.” In fact she runs a painting company in Mount Pleasant, S.C. and changed her name decades ago so she’d be taken more seriously in the business world.

Armstrong is not accepting campaign contributions – relying on the sweat of her brow and her “integrity” to get elected.  In fact her website – which resembles something a late 1990s middle school audio visual club put together – boasts her commitment to “no money elections” at the top of her platform list.


In a wide-ranging interview with FITS, Armstrong expounded on the “real enemy” facing America – which she contends is non-profit foundations that “don’t do anything” other than providing services already offered for free by the government.

“They are collecting billions across the country,” Armstrong told FITS, adding that non-profits like the National Kidney Foundation are “infecting the political community” and “ripping people off.”

“We have some really problematic laws that protect these people,” she said.  “At some point someone needs to know who the enemy infecting the country is.”

“All these non-profits are contributing to the Tea Party Republicans,” Armstrong added.

Armstrong has no love whatsoever for the Tea Party, which she believes is manipulating GOP politicians into policies that betray the middle class – which she claims to champion.

“The Tea Party has latched on the Republican Party – they are one in the same,” Armstrong told FITS.  “The Tea Party is like an Alabama tick sucking off the back of the hound dog.  Sooner or later it’s going to explode.”

“The Tea Party needs to form their own party,” she said.

What does Armstrong make of her opponent?  Not much.  In fact she accused Scott of speaking in “ebonics” and having an intelligence quotient (IQ) below that of Forrest Gump, the fictitious Alabama dimwit whose affability and innate goodness shone through in the 1994 film of the same name.

“Forrest Gump was a 69, he must be a sixty,” she said.

Gump’s IQ was actually 75, but who’s counting … right?


Armstrong also dropped a bombshell on her opponent – accusing him of breaking up the marriage of a gas station owner in the Charleston, S.C. area.

“He had an affair with a married woman – this was up on Ashley Phosphate road – the owner of the store told me about it,” she said.  

“He broke up their marriage,” Armstrong added, noting that the man “signed my petition.”

FITS asked Armstrong to provide the name of the gas station owner but she said she “did not remember it.”

Armstrong says she collected all 12,695 petition signatures by herself – beginning in January of this year.  She also challenged Scott to a series of televised debates, adding that she had “four or five questions he won’t be able to answer.”

Scott’s campaign wasn’t immediately available to respond to Armstrong’s allegations – or her debate challenge.

This website has run hot and cold with Scott, but in most cases he’s been a decent pro-taxpayer vote – especially since he was appointed last January to fill the unexpired term of former U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint.  His support of the corrupt, crony capitalist U.S. Export-Import Bank (a.k.a. “Boeing’s Bank”) is obviously an exception to that pro-taxpayer record, but Scott is clearly head and shoulders about liberal Lindsey Graham when it comes to the individual liberty/ pro-free market issues that matter to us.

Also running against Scott? Democratic nominee Joyce Dickerson and American Party candidate Jill Bossi.