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CSOL-InfiLaw Deal Clears Key ABA Panel

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NOW SOUTH CAROLINA’S GOVERNMENT NEEDS TO PERMIT SALE TO MOVE FORWARD …

By FITSNEWS  ||  The pending sale of the Charleston School of Law (CSOL) to InfiLaw received a key blessing from an American Bar Association (ABA) committee this week – further evidence the state of South Carolina needs to stand aside and permit this private transaction to move forward.

According to a letter posted to the CSOL website, the ABA’s accreditation committee has recommended the association’s legal education and bar admission council approve a request from the law school to transfer its licenses to InfiLaw.

“The Committee recommends that the Council grant acquiescence in the proposed purchase of the Law School’s assets by InfiLaw,” the letter reads.

Assuming the council approves the committee’s recommendation following a meeting on December 5, InfiLaw would be permitted to run the school as an ABA-accredited institution – one of the final hurdles in concluding the sale of the private institution.

If that happens, the only thing standing in the way of the sale would be the S.C. Commission on Higher Education (CHE) – which is statutorily authorized to license the deal from a business standpoint, not as it relates to accreditation.

The committee’s decision – which came after the ABA sent a team to Charleston, S.C. to investigate the request – is not surprising seeing as InfiLaw already operates three ABA-accredited schools.  Of course we’re sure it will spark shrill cries of recrimination from certain interests with a stake in seeing this deal undone.

These interests have been working for some time to sink the CSOL-Infilaw deal – ostensibly so a plan to subsidize the school with tax dollars can be revived.

We have consistently and steadfastly opposed such a plan … and will continue to do so moving forward.

Our state’s higher education system needs to be privatized, not expanded.  Meanwhile the private sector needs to be permitted to operate free from the meddling of government bureaucrats and self-serving trial lawyers.

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