By Robert Romano  ||  “While the voice of every Republican should be heard, our challenge is to figure out how to be a conservative party, without allowing the most extreme voices of the day to control our party and determine its future direction.”

That was former Virginia Lt. Governor Bill Bolling in the pages of the Washington Post responding to the election of Fred Gruber to head up Virginia’s 7th Congressional District Republican Committee. Bolling called the result “extremely disappointing.”

So, what was it about Gruber that compelled Bolling to refer to him as one of the “most extreme voices” in the Republican Party?

Judging from Gruber’s rather mundane campaign website, it is somewhat hard to say. His biography does state that “Fred believes our Party is on the wrong track, and has been an outspoken advocate for the need to reform.”

Okay, so he’s not an establishment guy, and is not supportive of the current Republican majority in the House, thinks we’re spending too much, and the like.

But so what? Isn’t there room in the Virginia Republican Party for activists like Gruber, who heads the Louisa, Virginia Tea Party and otherwise has spent his career as a financial analyst?

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Robert Romano is the Senior Editor of Americans for Limited Government.