sic speakingBy Will Folks  ||  I got an undergraduate degree in 1997 from The University of South Carolina – double-majoring in history and philosophy.  And before you ask me what I was thinking, I don’t remember.  Seriously … I was drunk or high the whole time.

Two years later I got a master’s degree in mass communication – again from the University of South Carolina.  That degree I sort of remember … although I was much more focused at the time on extracurriculars.

Of course when I was coming along it didn’t matter … the labor participation rate was 67.2 percent.  The unemployment rate was four percent.  And people were making the big sweet dollars no matter what they did.

Now?  Not so much.  America’s workforce is shrinking … so are its incomes.  And college degrees – which are pricier than ever – are no longer a ticket to gainful employment.  This week The Washington Post qualified just how S.O.L. lots of graduates are … breaking down salary information from PayScale to highlight which degrees lead to “underemployment.”

“Employees with degrees in fields like English, general studies, and graphic design are among the most likely to report feeling ‘underemployed’ at their current jobs,” the Post  report noted. “But more unexpectedly, majorities of graduates with more ‘practical’ degrees in fields like business administration also said their jobs didn’t put their education, training or experience to work as much as they should.”

And here’s the depressing infographic …