Dear Editor,

It is time the state of South Carolina defines the purpose and role of South Carolina State University.

There are no measures that show productive output for the students, potential employers, or the state that justify this extreme allocation of resources that would more efficiently benefit students of all races at any of the other public universities in the state.

Consider the numbers: Enrollment at S.C. State was 4,933 in 2007. It dropped 41 percent to 2,937 in the fall of 2013. Admissions standards have continuously eroded, with the mean SAT score of 799, significantly lower than any other four-year public institution in South Carolina.

The NCLEX-RN Passing Rate for S.C. State graduates over the past 4 years is 44 percent (63 of 145). The average for the other 12 institutions in South Carolina offering RN-BSN degrees is 91 percent (8067 0f 9801).

Yet despite the data, Palmetto State taxpayers fund S.C. State at a rate more than double that of the average for the other nine comprehensive teaching institutions.


Clemson University – 1254
USC-Columbia – 1212
College of Charleston – 1153
The Citadel – 1079
Winthrop University – 1037
Coastal Carolina University – 1004
USC-Aiken – 986
Lander University – 979
USC-Upstate – 972
Francis Marion University – 942
USC-Beaufort – 931
South Carolina State University – 799

Source: S.C. Commission on Higher Education


S.C. State University – $4,241.59
The Citadel – $3,310.51
Francis Marion – $3,220.03
Winthrop – $2,711.19
Lander – $2,232.32
USC Aiken – $2,067.02
AVERAGE – $2,009.01
College of Charleston – $1,877.12
USC Upstate – $1,723.97
USC Beaufort – $1,536.25
Coastal Carolina – $1,028.05

Source: S.C. Commission on Higher Education

The numbers above do not include the $6 million loan given to SC State in April to pay past due bills and payroll. S.C. State trustee Katon Dawson stated this spring that the state would be liable for $90 million in defaulted bonds and outstanding bills if the school fails.


“Johnny College”




“Johnny”: These are great stats.  Thank you for taking the time to gather this information and put pen to paper.  FITS has obviously voiced its opinion as to what should happen to S.C. State, but it’s always good to have data supporting one’s contention. Keep the letters coming … we’ll be happy to print any insights you may have regarding “higher education” in South Carolina.