InfiLaw – the glorified “diploma mill” looking to further dumb down the Charleston School of Law (CSOL) – scored a victory this week when S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson’s office weighed in on its attempt to purchase the private institution.

Wait … attempt to purchase?

Why in the hell is a private company “attempting to purchase” a private institution? If it has the money, why isn’t it just purchasing it?

Oh right … this is South Carolina, where government’s tentacles could plumb the depths of the Marianas Trench (with distance to spare).

Don’t get us wrong, we think the purchase of CSOL by InfiLaw – news of which broke exclusively on this site last year – would be a disaster. It’s a terrible idea, in fact. But that’s for the private sector to decide as a result of market forces, not government to decide as a result of political considerations.

Accordingly, we reject any effort by the S.C. Commission on Higher Education (CHE) or any other agency of the state to interfere with a private sector business transaction.

Wilson’s office agreed with us … sort of.

According to an advisory opinion issued by deputy attorney general Brendan McDonald and solicitor general Robert D. Cook, the CHE is limited by its statutory mandate and must rule in favor of any application for a higher education license that meets

“The CHE is a creature of statute and may exercise only those powers provided by law,” McDonald and Cook write.

According to InfiLaw supporters, this opinion “nullifies” a recent recommendation by a CHE subcommittee to deny InfiLaw’s license.

Officially, the company would only say through its attorney that “this opinion is important to the licensure process because the AG provides representation for the state in all legal proceedings.”

Translation? Good luck getting the AG to defend the CHE in the event InfiLaw files suit – which it clearly intends to do if its licensure application is denied.

The full Commission on Higher Education is expected to rule on the InfiLaw-CSOL deal next week …