It’s about time …

Orangeburg, S.C. attorney and Afghan War veteran (ask him, he’ll tell you) Bill Connor has launched the first true opposition ad targeting incumbent liberal Lindsey Graham in South Carolina’s 2014 GOP U.S. Senate primary.

One of four (soon to be five) announced challengers to Graham in the June 10 primary, Connor’s spot blasts the veteran lawmaker  for his effusive praise of former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton – the presumptive frontrunner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

I was at the TEA Party debate when I first saw this footage of Graham praising and hugging Hillary,” Connor said of his spot. “I thought it represented what’s most frustrating to South Carolina conservatives about Lindsey Graham – the inherent hypocrisy of calling himself a conservative when he campaigns, but acting like and voting like a moderate or liberal the rest of the time.”

Hard to argue that Graham is a hypocrite … although as we’ve noted on several prior occasions Connor is hardly the ideal choice to replace him.

Anyway, here’s the spot …

Connor’s ad is airing statewide on Fox News at cost of roughly $7,500 for two weeks.

“Plans are to continue at this pace … increasing until election day representing a $200,000 commitment for cable advertising,” a source familiar with the buy told FITS. “We will add broadcast in April.”

“My plan was always to get on TV first and to stay there,” Connor said in a statement.

Obviously … which is why he gave his campaign $200,000.

Anyway, Connor’s ad is interesting in that it targets Graham as opposed to one (or more) of the race’s other challengers – Lowcountry businesswoman Nancy Mace, S.C. Sen. Lee Bright, Upstate businessman Richard Cash or Midlands, S.C. preacher Det Bowers.

Why is that “interesting?” Because Graham has a $7.6 million mountain of special interest money … whereas the other challengers (led by Mace) top out well shy of $500,000.

Wouldn’t the smart play be to first pick off the other wanna-be “anti-Grahams?”

“As you may have noticed, the national and state debate has not been about who can beat Lindsey. Rather, it’s can he be beat?” one Connor supporter told FITS. “Everybody knows Lindsey starts as Goliath. We have to first prove he’s vulnerable to rocks. The best way to get the job of David is make it clear how well you throw.”

Hmmmmmm …

Connor does have one potential advantage over the rest of the anti-Graham field in the advertising battle – he’s run statewide before (a losing bid for lieutenant governor in 2010). That means he doesn’t have to spend quite as much time – and money – introducing himself to voters, and can focus more of his energy on attacking Graham.