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In case you hadn’t figured it out black people are livid over the Trayvon Martin verdict – gathering at hastily arranged press conferences across the country to voice their displeasure. Not surprisingly candidates for public office are among the speakers at these rallies – which has resulted in all sorts of jockeying for position in front of eager banks of race-baiting television cameras.

In Charleston, S.C., controversy arose last week when the leading candidate for S.C. Senate District 42 – the “majority-minority” seat vacated last month due to the resignation of S.C. Sen. Robert Ford – was permitted to speak at a “Justice for Trayvon” press event.

Why was the speech delivered by attorney Marlon Kimpson so controversial?

It wasn’t … the controversy stems from the fact none of his opponents in the race for Ford’s seat were given an opportunity to speak.

“I wanted to let my community know how I felt about the verdict, and what needs to be done to make sure something like this doesn’t happen in our state,” said Emmanuel Ferguson, an assistant solicitor in Charleston who is also running for Ford’s seat.

Ferguson wasn’t permitted to share his thoughts, though. In fact he says the event’s organizers deliberately excluded him – and threatened to have him arrested for merely showing up.

Wow … that’s cold.

Whining about this verdict is obviously nothing but politically motivated pandering, but if a group is going to hold an event on public property and allow one candidate for public office to speak – then it’s poor form to threaten another with incarceration for attempting to do the same thing.

Everybody at the “Al Sharpton Idol” auditions should have been given a chance to throw in their two cents …

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