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By a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled an entire section of the 1965 Voting Rights Act (VRA) unconstitutional – a far-reaching decision which directly impacts South Carolina and eight other states.

Specifically, the court tossed section four of the legislation – which deals with the formula for determining which states are required to “pre-clear” changes to their election law with the U.S. Department of Justice (USDOJ). The VRA was last authorized by the U.S. Congress in 2006, however the government is still using data from 1972 to determine which states are subject to this “pre-clearance” requirement.

A county government in Alabama argued this was unfair … and won.

Liberals were apoplectic, including U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Georgia). The former civil rights leader bristled at the decision, accusing the court of putting “a dagger in the heart of the Voting Rights Act.” At the heart of the left’s indignation is the potential for the dismantling of “majority-minority” districts – in which natural geographic borders are manipulated (a.k.a. “gerrymandered”) so as to guarantee that a majority of eligible voters are black.

Well, we’ve got two words for these liberals – “Tim Scott.”

For those of you unfamiliar with the name, he’s the black U.S. Senator who was elected to a lily white district in the S.C. House – and later the U.S. House of Representatives. He was also appointed to a seat in the U.S. Senate recently by Nikki Haley, the Indian-American woman elected to statewide office in 2010 in South Carolina.

And while this website has had plenty of not-so-nice things to say about both Haley and Scott (especially Haley), the fact they were elected in an ostensibly “discriminatory” state like South Carolina is compelling evidence that VRA “pre-clearance” requirements are antiquated.

In fact we said as much last September … 

Furthermore … what exactly have “majority-minority” districts in South Carolina produced?

Corruption … and more corruption.

We cannot continue to let race dictate our decisions. That’s not equality, it is discrimination. The ultimate standard of equality is a society is when equal protection is guaranteed … and preferential treatment is outlawed.

Oh, and speaking of “equal protection,” there is a major voting rights issue that U.S. President Barack Obama’s DOJ needs to get busy addressing if it is to have even a shred of credibility criticizing the court’s decision.

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