home school

Not content with denying choices to tens of thousands of low income students trapped in failing schools – or tens of thousands of middle income students stuck in mediocre schools – South Carolina’s education establishment is now seeking to impose its will upon home school families.

Specifically, a trio of status quo state lawmakers have filed bill which would require home school students to subject themselves to the same failed government accountability measures as their public school counterparts.

For those of you unfamiliar with state government’s definition of “accountability,” it consists of constantly weakening our academic standards to give the illusion of progress. And yet still falling short.

In fact this total lack of accountability is one reason so many parents have sought out (or tried to seek out) alternative solutions for their children’s education … and one reason state government works overtime to preserve its education monopoly.

However under H. 3748, home schooled children would be forced to take “state-approved standardized tests” – which of course would have to be administered by a government educrat (ka-CHING).

Sponsoring this nonsense are status quo S.C. Representatives Jenny Horne (RINO – Charleston), Doug Brannon (RINO – Spartanburg) and Mike Anthony (D – Union). Another Democrat, Joe Jefferson, took his name off of the legislation this week.

“This legislation is about power, pure and simple,” our friends at the Spartanburg Tea Party point out. “It galls the administrative bureaucracy to see students succeeding without their direction, and they are finally taking steps to bring them into their fold of failure. That’s the big government approach, isn’t it? Look to someone who is succeeding, and patronizingly regulate away everything that produced success in the first place.”

Exactly … well, that and making sure the power of the marketplace is never brought to bear on our state’s chronic academic woes. Because God forbid our children actually learn anything.

We oppose this legislation – and any further effort by government to expand its failed “accountability” programs. In fact it is well past time this state acknowledged the failure of its $9 billion-a-year government school experiment and let the market provide real accountability over academic achievement.

H. 3748