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In October 2011, S.C. Rep. Andy Patrick (RINO-Beaufort) endorsed former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum’s bid for the GOP presidential nomination.

“I am excited to endorse Senator Santorum’s campaign for President,” Patrick said at the time. “He has been a staunch defender of what makes America great. He understands that American exceptionalism is found in our founding principles that each and every American has been given rights and that it is the government’s job to simply protect these rights, not spread them around.”

Okay … this website obviously can’t stand Santorum (and the other “Bush Republicans” whose fiscal liberalism ushered in the age of Barack Obama), but whatever – we respect anyone’s right to endorse someone based on what they believe.

Of course Patrick’s endorsement of Santorum had very little to do with “belief,” and a lot to do with money. In fact the security company owned by the state lawmaker – who is currently seeking the GOP nomination for South Carolina’s first congressional district – got paid an average of $18,167 a month by Santorum shortly after making this endorsement.

Patrick’s company – Advance Point Global – received a total of $109,495 from Santorum’s campaign from February to July of 2012, ostensibly to provide security for the GOP presidential candidate.

Beyond the obvious “pay-to-say” implications, what makes this arrangement even more fishy? In February 2012 – the first month Patrick began receiving payments from Santorum – the former U.S. Senator received Secret Service protection, rendering Patrick’s service unnecessary.

Also, Patrick told his local paper – The (Hilton Head, S.C.) Island Packet – in late February that his contract was “complete.”

Why does this matter?

Well for starters Patrick missed 11 of the first 19 roll call votes of the 2012 session of the S.C. General Assembly while he was busy playing “Secret Agent Man” with Santorum. In fact he missed a vote of critical importance to his constituents – the House’s unanimous rebuke of S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley’s infamous “Savannah River Sellout.”

In other words he used his influence to benefit himself while simultaneously abandoning his constituents.

Earlier this month FITS reported on allegations that Patrick attempted to improperly steer state business to his firm. We’re also investigating allegations regarding the dubios veracity of some of the claims made on his corporate website.

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